Category: Veganism (page 1 of 3)

Farming for a Future

Farmer Jay herd at Hillside BBC

News
that the
Vegan Society is working with Bradley Nook Farm in Derbyshire to transition from beef to vegan organics is the icing on the (vegan) cake of all our years of campaigning. It shows the great value of networking both within the vegan movement and with movements beyond in the wider world. 

Veggies met up with farmer Jay when catering at Northern Green Gatherings at his inherited family farm. The farm near Ashbourne, Derbyshire is also one of a number of locations used on rotation for Earth First! Gatherings. As vegan campaign caterers Veggies has catered for EF! since the very first gathering in 1991, helping in a small way to maintain a vegan ethos in the grass roots eco-action movement.

It was through the involvement of long term Veggies member Cathy in another Vegan Society project (hospital catering) that the opportunity​ came about to mention in conversation the potential to veganise Jay’s farm. The rest is, as they say, history, and hopefully a turning point in the transition of many more livestock farms to the compassionate and efficient farming of Food for a Future.

Hosting camps & gatherings can provide a useful income stream for vegan landowners. We will actively encourage the gatherings at which we cater to consider holding events at Bradley Nook Farm. As participants in the Northern Green Gathering (NGG) held there each August, we will urge the organisers to encourage other caterers at the event to honour the compassionate stance of the farm by highlighting vegan options. We know this to be a popular position to take as Nottingham Green Festival has declared a fully vegan ethos from 2017.

Meanwhile Jay has already discussed plans for his new ventures with Derbyshire Dales District Council.

He said: “We’ve got a huge range of brick buildings on the farm which are unused. We’re hoping to turn those into a vegan restaurant, a vegan teaching kitchen and accommodation for people who would like to come and help on the vegetable growing. A vegan holidays sort of thing.” (Derby Telegraph)

Since 1984 Veggies Catering Campaign has saved hundreds of cows by simply selling, with vegan attitude, possibly half a million Veggies Burgers. All those lives were unknown to us, but the path has led to 100 individual living, breathing lives that you can now meet at Hillside Animal Rescue:

 

Farmer Jays Cows at Hillside The cows are now being cared for by Hillside Animal Sanctuary in Norfolk which is fundraising for their keep

Please sponsor Hillside to help the cows – please click here or telephone the Hillside Cow Rescue Helpline on 01603 736200 (9am to 10pm).Please Help the Cows

or by bank transfer donation to…
The Co-operative Bank
Account No: 69668302
Sort Code: 08-92-99

 
Or by post to Hillside Animal Sanctuary
Hill Top Farm, Hall Lane, Frettenham, Norwich, NR12 7LT

Vegetarian Farmer Jay article in Vegan Trade Journal
Read the full story in the Vegan Trade Journalfree download here
 

Visit freefromharm.org to read the inspiring stories of other former meat & dairy farmers that became vegan activists.

The story of Farmer Jay is also featured in / at / on:
 

 

BBC News 13 June 2017

A vegetarian farmer has given his herd of cows to an animal sanctuary to protect them from the slaughterhouse.

Jay Wilde, 59, who farms in Ashbourne, Derbyshire, sent 63 cattle to a Norfolk rescue centre as he could no longer bear to send them to be killed.

Mr Wilde, a vegetarian for 25 years, grew up herding cows and took over the family farm when his father died.

“Cows have good memories and a range of emotions. They form relationships. I’ve even seen them cry,” he said.

“It was very difficult to do your best to look after them and then send them to the slaughterhouse for what must be a terrifying death.”

The Hillside Animal Sanctuary near Frettenham said 30 of the cows are pregnant and all the animals “would live out their lives essentially as pets”.

Founder, Wendy Valentine, said Mr Wilde is not the first farmer to have donated his herd.

She recalls a couple who “could not bear to continue dairy farming and kept their cows as pets with the help of the sanctuary”.

Mr Wilde, who switched from dairy farming to organic beef production on the death of his father in 2011, said he always wanted to give up animal production because he “couldn’t believe it was right to eat them”.

He believes dairy farming is particularly hard because calves and cows would often become distressed on separation.

“I’m relieved to have made the decision to no longer farm animals, something which I always found quite upsetting,” he said.

His brother-in-law told him he was “absolutely insane” to give away cattle which could fetch up to £40,000 at market.

He said “a lack of imagination” had previously stopped him switching to arable farming.

Mr Wilde will now be running a vegan organic market farm supplying garden produce without using animal products or fertilisers.

 


Farmer Jay Independent
 
 
A herd of cows from the East Midlands will be mooing a sigh of relief thanks the kindness of their owner, vegetarian farmer Jay Wilde who has sent them to live out their days in an animal sanctuary.

 Leaving their old cattle sheds at Bradley Nook Farm in Ashbourne, Derbyshire, the 59 cows were rehomed in Norfolk at the Hillside Animal Sanctuary on Monday.

A vegetarian for a total of 25 years, Mr Wilde told The Times that he found it “very difficult to do your best to look after them and then send them to the slaughterhouse for what must be a terrifying death.”

“I’m relieved to have made the decision to no longer farm animals, something which I always found quite upsetting,” Mr Wilde said.

“Cows have good memories and a range of emotions. They form relationships. I’ve even seen them cry.” 

The herd, worth £40,000 at market, will avoid the abattoir to join the sanctuary’s 300 cattle and 2,000 horses, donkeys and ponies. Mr Wilde has kept ten as “pets.”

The founder of the sanctuary, Wendy Valentine, said Mr Wilde’s cattle could now enjoy their full 25-year lifespans rather than reaching the slaughter age of two to three years. 

The sanctuary was started in 1995 to draw attention to the effects of factory farming and needs to raise a minimum of £5m per year to continue to care for the animals. 

The donation was organised by the Vegan Society and Mr Wilde now plans to farm organic vegetables free of animal products and fertilisers to sell in the flourishing vegan market. 

Tom Kuehnel, the Vegan Society’s campaign officer, told The Independent: “Jay is a real pioneer, which we hope will inspire other farmers to move towards more compassionate and sustainable farming methods that don’t involve animals.”

… full story …

Vegan Fivers

Keep old fivers in circulation and support the vegan community


You will have heard that the new five pound notes contain tallow, a rendered form of beef or mutton fat.

This is unacceptable to millions of vegans, vegetarians, Hindus, Sikhs, Jains and others in the U.K.   A petition at calling on the Bank of England to remove tallow from bank notes had received over 134k signatures (at 7th Feb’17)

The Bank of England is treating the concerns with “utmost seriousness” and state that they are looking for “potential solutions”.

However, in all other areas where animal products appear in unexpected places we can make a choice to choose alternatives, but the withdrawal of the old fivers by 5th May 2017 will leave the vegan community & others with no option in handling ‘meaty’ fivers.

The solution is to draw as many old fivers out of general circulation ourselves and retain them to spend amongst our own community, at vegan cafes, shops, festivals, fairs & markets. 

[Vegan Fiver labels here]

How you can help:

  • Keep your old fivers and only spend them at vegan (or veggie) businesses – ask them to do the same.
  • Ask for old fivers when getting change from other businesses.
  • Ask friendly local shops, your post office, cafe, pub, transport provider etc to ‘sell’ you as many old fivers as they can save.
  • Sticker your fivers (see below) to encourage this initiative.
  • Spend your ‘vegan fivers’ in a different veggie / vegan place each time to encourage them to support the campaign.
  • Post pictures of your ‘vegan fivers’ being spent. Hashtag #veganfivers. Linkback here.
  • To add your ideas to support this campaign contact us by email, on twitter, or facebook.

We will list here any places enthusiastically accepting ‘vegan fivers’, including:

To be added to this list contact us.

We also hear that the Rainbow Cafe in Cambridge refuses to take the new £5 note.
 

After 5th May they  won’t be Bank of England fivers, they’ll be ours, worth £5 to each other, so let’s keep using them, at least until such time as we are given an ethical alternative.

However, even after  5th May,  Bank of England notes retain their face value for all time, so can always be cashed in at most banks, and Veggies Catering Campaign will always accept them in any quantity at the many vegan festivals, markets & fair, and other events on our diary, all over the UK.

Where have you spent your Vegan £ivers?

Tell us on Twitter or Facebook.

 


We have designed (removable) stickers that can be used to encourage the people to keep the ‘meat-free’ fivers in informal circulation. You could try to print from the downloads versions (see below), if the formatting doesn’t work, do-it-yourself with similar text to this:

Vegan £iver

Spend this £5 at a vegan market, store, cafe, festival or fair.

When given or received as change consider it to be a vegan voucher

For all life on earth – the future is vegan

http://www.veggies.org.uk/2017/02/vegan-fivers/

We are putting a sticker with  the above text on the back so as to :

  • not cover the serial number on  the front
  • not cover the watermark
  • not cover the Queen (no need to cause unnecessary offense or face treason  charges!)

To draw attention to the details on the back we have these small stickers on the front:

Vegan £iver

P.T.O for details

Downloads

Artwork for stickers for back of fivers : .odt (word format) / pdf
For 21 per sheet 63.5 x 38mm Avery Labels (or equivalent).

Artwork for stickers for front of fivers (2 per fiver) : .odt (word format) / pdf

For 65 per sheet 38.1 x 21.2mm Avery Labels (or equivalent).

If these sticker formats don’t work for you, you could print onto plain paper & use Pritt Stick, or other vegan-friendly gum.

… Or we can send you labels for the cost of printing & posting them:

    • Postage (once) 73p p&p

Annoyingly once you have selected ‘postage’ (above) you will be jumped to the top of the page. Sorry about that. Please then scroll back here to order the labels (below).

  • Labels for 21 Vegan Fivers x 25p (adjust order for number of sheets required)

Beyond meat: The end of food as we know it?

We should not feed plants to animals for meat, cheese, milk & eggs … we should use plants to actually make them!

The Giuseppe program from Chile’s Not Company (NotCo) are replicating animal ingredients, but entirely based on plants.

A group of Chilean scientists are on a mission to change the way that we make food and reduce the impact of animal faming on the environment in the process . The researchers have set up a company that uses artificial intelligence to find a way to replicate animal-based products like milk, yoghurt, cheese and mayonnaise, using plant based ingredients.

Listen to this exciting report 18mins40″ in to this Science in Action program from BBC World Service and read more:meet-the-worlds-smartest-food-scientist-guiseppe.

Talk to Al Jazeera – Beyond meat: The end of food as we know it?

Published on Feb 6, 2016

With the latest breakthroughs in artificial intelligence a whole new concept of food may soon radically change what we eat. And at the same time, some experts believe, it could reduce global warming.
No longer based on animal ingredients, this is a food entirely based on plants – although it looks and tastes like the classic food based on ingredients derived from animals.

This is not a new idea, it has been around for about 10 years.

But the breakthrough has been delayed, perhaps one of the reasons is that many consumers still prefer locally produced food, they want to trust the supply chain, and not simply depend on big manufacturers.

However, a group of young scientists in Chile are working on alternatives for a sustainable and meatless future.

Commercial engineer Matias Muchnick and Harvard research associate Karim Pichara are two of the founders of the Not Company.Together with biochemist Isidora Silva they are developing new plant-based food and are determined to bring it to people in their local market.

Part of what motivates them is what they consider to be the biggest drawback of classic animal farming: It requires massive amounts of land and it affects global warming.

According to the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization, livestock contributes both directly and indirectly to climate change through the emissions of greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide, methane and nitrous oxide.

Livestock is also a major driver of deforestation, desertification, as well as the release of carbon from cultivated soils. Overall the livestock sector is contributing 2.7 billion tonnes of CO2 emission according to the UN.

“When you get behind the scenes of the food industry, you don’t like what you see. There is a lot of things that we should be knowing… but we are blindsided by a whole industry that is making it really hard for us to see what we are really eating,” says Matias Muchnick.

The main scientist of the Not Company team is a computer, an artificial intelligence algorithm programmed to become the smartest food scientist in the world.

It uses deep learning parameters to understand food at a molecular level, helping the team to deliver tasty and affordable nutrition while using less water, less land, less energy, and without the need to cultivate harmful bio systems like animals.

It’s a complicated process but it’s designed to understand human perception of taste and texture which allows it to suggest clever recipes for sustainable and tasty plant-based foods. And it even understands the availability and use of resources for every single plant in the company’s database.

“We want people to eat better, but without even knowing, that’s the main objective of the Not Company,” Muchnick says.

But does the new model of food production really work? Will it be popular among consumers? What does it mean for the future of food? Are we at the tipping point of a food revolution?

The team behind the Not Company talks to Al Jazeera to discuss their work, their goals and their vision for the future of the food industry.

 

Joan Court R.I.P

Joan Court & DarrenWe are sad to bring you the news of Joan Court‘s death this month. She died very peacefully, her cats around her. She was ninety seven.
 
Joan’s Funeral will be on Wednesday 14th December at 12.45 pm in Cambridge City Crematorium, Huntingdon Road, Cambridge CB3 0JJ

 It will be followed by a party to celebrate Joan’s life at Mill Road Baptist Church, 178 Mill Road, Cambridge, CB1 3LP Veggies will be providing food and drink but it is strictly non-alcoholic!
 
All Joan’s friends are warmly invited. If you are able to come, please email JoanCourt74@gmail.com.
 
Joan requested donations instead of flowers, to be shared equally between Animal Aid and Hunt Sabs.There will be collection boxes at the party.

 It would be lovely if you could bring something purple (e.g. a ribbon or a flower) to put on her coffin at the crematorium.
 
We will have Memory Boards at the party, and we hope that you will post a memory or a thought about Joan. After the party we will put these together into a book to celebrate her life.
 
I do hope you can come, and help us make this a true celebration of an amazing life.
 
Joan was a tireless campaigner who has supported Veggies Catering on many occasions. Her book ‘In the Shadow of Mahatma Gandhi’ has been available from Veggies bookstall.
 


Today we say goodbye to a great warrior for the oppressed, Joan Court who was a nurse, midwife and social worker, who walked with Mahatma Ghandi, who fought for the rights of women in India and Pakistan, who fought for children’s rights and for the rights of non humans. In 2013 she came to the Gloucestershire badger cull zone and, we think, in her mid 90s was the oldest sab in the field for the 2 nights she was out. Total respect and love to this wonderful lady, sleep well Joan, you have earned it xxxxx

Image may contain: 1 person, smiling, cat

A tribute to Joan Court, written by Andrew Tyler of Animal Aid, has appeared on the “other lives” section of the Guardian website & in print edition on 24 December.

https://www.theguardian.com/law/2016/dec/22/joancourtobituary

My friend Joan Court, the animal and human rights activist, who has died aged 97, was driven by a powerful impulse to expose and remedy injustice and cruelty. She was also, as she put it, a “born sensualist”, her tastes running to strong colours, perfumes and “exciting action”. This, and her desire to do good, underpinned her many adventures.

Her start in life was hard: her father, Cecil Court, a solicitor, took his own life, and her mother, Muriel (nee Gibson), was an alcoholic. She had an older brother, Peter.

Joan’s schooling ended when she was 12, after her father’s death. She and her mother moved from their London home to work in domestic service in Cornwall and then Cape Town, South Africa. Returning to London in 1936, she went on to qualify as a nurse and midwife at St Thomas’ hospital, and as a social worker in Bristol. She practised as a midwife and, funded initially by the Friends Service Council (FSC) and later as a World Health Organisation employee, worked in impoverished regions of India and Turkey, and the Appalachian mountains of North America.

In the 1960s, she was appointed director of the NSPCC battered child research unit, and was influential in gaining acceptance of a then unfamiliar concept in the UK.

In 1946, when she was working for the FSC, organising midwifery services in the slums of Calcutta (Kolkata), she met and got to know Mahatma Gandhi. Joan, a lifelong vegetarian, developed a profound respect for his commitment, compassion and determination to achieve change through non-violent means. She tried to emulate these goals, campaigning first for children and, for the last 38 years, for animals.

In 1978, after seeing a poster describing the horrors of animal research, she took part in an Animal Aid anti-vivisection march in Cambridge. The next day she founded a new Cambridge group, which was soon involved in all animal-related issues, including live exports, hunting, shooting, whaling and the meat and dairy industries.

Her advanced age made her attention-grabbing stunts also irresistible to the media. Her animal campaigning began just before she was 60 – when she gained a social anthropology degree from Cambridge. There were banner-hangs, public hunger strikes and sit-downs in inconvenient
places. She locked herself in a cage and chained herself to railings. In speeches and interviews she refused to apologise for radical direct action, although she was opposed to violence.

Her most lasting triumph was, with Pat Griffin and Sue Hughes, as one of three Cambridge “granarchists” who initiated what became a national campaign of opposition to Cambridge University’s plans for a massive new research facility that would have specialised in invasive neurologicalexperiments on monkeys. The university abandoned the project in January  2004.

At the age of 85, she joined the Sea Shepherd flagship, Farley Mowat, on a hunt for illegal fishing vessels in the South Atlantic.

Joan could be self-absorbed, cantankerous, bossy and infuriating, but her friends were friends for life.

 

Nottingham Green Festival

We are delighted to announce that the Nottingham Green Festival will return on Sunday 11th September, following its hugely successful relaunch in 2015.

The event is organised by grass roots, community based volunteers, with no statutory funding, so your help would be most welcome. Whilst we are only a small part of the organising team, Veggies is pleased to provide support by facilitating planning meetings, hosting the NottmGreenFest.org.uk website and, of course, providing Food by Veggies on the day!

Due to the withdrawal of funding the event did not happen in 2014, but Veggies covered essential up-front expenses and the Nottingham community rose to the challenge of making it happen in 2015, regardless of the tight budget. However these funds will need to be recouped and recycled long before 11th September to fund this year’s event, so your support is invited:

Show support for the event by making a small donation. Click the button to donate with PayPal or credit/debit cards; send a cheque to “Nottingham Green Festival”, c/o Sumac Centre, 245 Gladstone Street, Nottingham NG7 6HX; or transfer directly to: Nottingham Green Festival, Unity Trust Bank, sort code 08-60-01, a/c no 53110426 …more…

Nottingham Green Festival Ethos

Inspired by the decision by Shambala Festival to be the first mid-scale commercial festival to declare a meat free policy – a position established by Nottingham Green Festival over 30 year ago – we welcome a debate about whether to stay ahead of the game by taking the next logical step, aiming for vegan catering, whilst sharing info inviting other stall holders to leave animal products at home on this occasion.

“Shambala HQ is a mixed bag, with vegans, veggies and meat eaters co-existing harmoniously together, but the whole team agrees that it is important to be bold with our environmental stance, and encourage this debate.”

“The research available clearly demonstrates that overall, a meat-free diet has about half the carbon impact of a meat diet, and a dairy-free vegan diet has a third of the impact.”

Please, see the full meat-and-fish-free-for-2016 discussion.

As Shambala say: “We’re certainly not trying to tell everyone they should become vegan overnight. We are simply not serving meat for [4 days at] the festival to reduce the festival’s impacts, to take a stance, and to encourage an important debate.”

Please let us know what you think: info@NottmGreenFest.org.uk


Nottingham Green Festival Gallery

Veggies is also hosting a mailing list for announcements, news and information about Nottingham Green Festival. (Note: You may get a ‘security certificate‘ warning! Fear not; this is because the list is provided by The Riseup Collective, an activist internet group that doesn’t tick all the corporate boxes). You can safely click through. Honest. Please do subscribe.

Nottingham Green Festival LogoYour support will make all the difference in ensuring the success of Nottingham’s own Green Festival, the place for the whole family to learn, explore and try the latest in everything environmentally friendly and ethical, whilst also having lots of fun in the beautiful setting of the Arboretum Park, Waverley Street / Addison Street, a couple of minutes from Nottingham’s Old Market Square.

With your help, the event will have over 100 product, information and food stalls, kids rides, workshops, natural therapies and sustainable technologies, performers and entertainment throughout the park and live music from the bandstand.

Visit the Nottingham Green Festival website for more event details.


Womens Lib = Animal Lib

Published by Veggies for Derby Womens Day 2015

Animal Lib Human Lib logo“As women enjoy the gains we have made in the path to our own equality, we must continue to assert our own presence and recognize our uniquely personal stake in fighting for those who are still being silenced.” – How Sexism and Animal Cruelty Coexist by Theresa Noll

“Why vegan? We maintain that Nonhuman Animals represent a distinct at-risk social group. Fighting against human inequality makes no sense so long as we perpetuate the inequality of other animals. What we eat, what we wear, how we entertain ourselves, etc. is so often built on the oppression of Nonhuman Animals (which also oppresses vulnerable human groups). Speciesism, racism, sexism, disableism, heterosexism, classism, etc. are all rooted in the same source operating with similar ideologies and mechanisms” – Vegan Feminist Movement

“A noun is a person, place, or thing,” we obediently recite as children. What, then, are nonhuman animals? They aren’t people or places, so – convention tells us – they must be things. Current English usage is speciesist. It glorifies the human species and belittles all others. Just as sexist language demeans women and excludes them from full consideration, speciesist language demeans and excludes nonhuman animals. When we consign other animals to the category thing, we obscure their sentience, individuality and right to autonomy.” – On The Issues Magazine: A Magazine of Feminist, Progressive Thinking

Feminist Animal Liberation LogoAn interesting read about the connections between Feminism and Animal Rights is, ‘The Sexual Politics of Meat: A Feminist-Vegetarian Critical Theory’ by Carol Adams. The award-winning book explores a relationship between patriarchal values and meat eating by interweaving the insights of feminism, vegetarianism, animal defense, and literary theory.

What’s Wrong With the Dairy Industry?

Dairy cow and calf“After repeated cycles of forced impregnations, painful births, relentless milkings, and crushing bereavements, their spirit gives, their bodies wither, their milk dries up. At the age when, in nature, a female cow would barely enter adulthood, the life of a dairy cow is over. When her milk ‘production’ declines, she and her other ‘spent’ herd mates are trucked off to slaughter. Some are pregnant. All are still lactating. As they are shoved towards death, they drip milk onto the killing floor… All dairy operations, including Organic, exist solely by doing to millions of defenseless females the worst thing anyone can do to a mother.”

“Milk Comes from a Grieving Mother” ~ leaflet by Peaceful Prairie Sanctuary

Most people can see the animal exploitation inherent in the meat industry, but the dairy industry isn’t immediately obvious. Dairy cows are portrayed as having an idyllic life but the reality is that cows (like all mammals) only produce milk for their young in response to giving birth. The animals are kept in a cycle of near constant pregnancy and lactation (meaning huge physical and metabolic stress, often leading to disease and exhaustion). Each cow also suffers the separation from their young, calling for each other desperately – something which has been studied and even the dairy industry themselves admit it causes emotional stress. Male calves are often unwanted ‘by-products’ of the dairy industry and are shot at only a few hours old.

Feminists for animal lib photo

Photo: 1980's 'Feminists for Animal Rights' - a network of women striving to live cruelty-free lives.

Want to Ditch the Meat and Dairy?

Visit the following websites for more information:

Vegan Society – www.vegansociety.com
Viva! – www.milkmyths.org.uk
Vegan Kit – www.vegankit.com

Vegan RevolutionYou can buy lots of alternatives to meat and dairy in supermarkets – many sell their own brand products and also other vegan brands. But for the most ethical option we recommend shopping at your local independent health food shop. In Derby we support the vegan shop Sound Bites on Morledge.

Most meat-based meals can simply be veganised using meat-free alternatives such as veggie mince (such as Veggies burger mix, veggie burgers and tofu.

Vegan alternatives to milk

altThere are a great variety of milk alternatives that are widely available. Most people know about soya milk, but there is also oat, coconut, rice, hazelnut, almond and hemp!

Vegan alternatives to butter

There are soya, sunflower, olive and coconut blend spreads.

Vegan alternatives to cheese

There are all kinds of cheese substitutes – cheddar, edam, mozarella, parmesan, spreadable soft cheeses and meltable cheese for pizza. Some are soya based and some nut based.

Vegan chocolate!

Lots of dark chocolate is already vegan but there is also a wide range of vegan chocolate, with milk chocolate, white chocolate and every other variety under the sun.

There there are also vegan alternatives to dairy yoghurt, cream, ice cream, cakes, mayonnaise… anything you can think of really! What’s more, there are exciting new products all the time.

Feel free to Contact Veggies for any help or advice.

Download the flier – 3 jpg files

Women's Day flier Women's Day flier Womens Day flier

or download as pdf file here


Christmas at Veggies & Sumac

After an active period travelling all over to support everyone else’s vegan festivities, ending with the Worcester Vegan Fair, Veggie are looking forward to kicking back on Saturday 21st December.

Our friends at our Sumac Centre home base will be celebrating the longest night of the year with a festive bring-a-dish-mega-meal at the Sumac Centre!

The bar will be serving mulled wine and mince pies along with it’s usual fare, we’ll have fire in a barrel in the yard for you to warm your hands and there’ll be fairy lights, bunting and candles galore as we transform the centre into a festive wonderland.

The sumac cafe will provide enough roast potatoes and gravy to feed the masses but the rest is up to you!

So bring a vegan dish to share of your festive favourites, savoury or sweet, and join in the feast!

This isn’t a regular People’s Kitchen and there are limited spaces for the meal so if you’d like to be part of it, please buy your ticket in advance.

We have 50 tickets which we’ll be selling at the bar over the next two weeks or you can reserve your ticket by emailing sumaccafe@gmail.com. There’s a suggested donation of £3 and all money raised will go towards the new Sumac boiler fund so feel free to give more if you can!

To ensure you get a slice of ALL the action, arrive on time at 7pm.

We’ll be decorating the centre, chopping, baking and generally merrymaking from 2pm so come get stuck in!

Christmas Day

There are also a few spaces at the Christmas Day get-together at Sumac Centre on Wednesday 25th December. Veggies’ Chrissy is heading up a vegan Christmas Feast, to contribute between £5 & £10, according to their means.

For more info or to express your interest contact us.

…more…

For more ideas and info to celebrate a Caring and Compassionate Christmas. visit our Vegan Christmas blog.

That’s all folks, for 2013, but we already have over a dozen events on Veggies 2014 events diary, including our own 30th Anniversary!

So, our thanks and best wishes go out to all our volunteers, friends and supporters. If you can’t make it to one of the end of year celebrations, we look forward to seeing you next year,


Milk of Human Kindness

Milk of Human KindnessFor over 30 years Veggies of Nottingham have been working to promote compassionate catering. In all those years we have never used calves milk, nor any other animal products. In 1984 this was unheard of, but now customers rarely ask “do you have normal milk” – Plant Milk Is Normal.

The choice is no longer soya milk or calves milk. With Oat, Hemp, Coconut, Rice, Soya, Spelt, Almond, Hazelnut, Flax and many more plant milks widely available, why would any one choose to cause suffering to cows and their calves.

With the support of Granovita (soya milk), Koko (coconut milk) Good Hemp (hemp milk) and others, Veggies continues to bring these many choices to vegans and non-vegans alike.

Different milks may be preferred for different purposes. Some are better to make smoothies or ice-cream, for cooking, on cereals, or for use in tea & coffee.

Experiment. Enjoy them all!

non-dairy milks

This non-dairy milk spotter chart is from the Stop the Cull facebook page. For a discussion of many more choices and preferences visit the Stop the Cull site.

See also the Vegan’s Guide to Non-Dairy Milks

The dairy industry is pressing for the killing of 70% badgers in cull zones, but what else can farmers do to ‘protect’ their cows? When they have killed ‘their’ cows at an unnaturally young age (when their milk production falls), they could grow almonds, hazelnuts, oats or hemp instead. The efficiencies of growing food for direct human consumption might free up land for wildlife, and even for ex-dairy cattle to live out their lives in retirement.

Tips for successful use of plant milks

These days people understand that soya milk may separate in coffee – they rarely complain, but they do seek the solution.

The factors behind soy milk separating are acidity and temperature.

The solution: the optimal temperature to brew coffee if about 93 °C – not boiling.
If your milk separates simply add more milk, allow coffee to cool or make it less strong. Some milks settle, so it is always worth giving a quick shake before use.

Advice for going dairy-free is available from the Animal Aid website.

Read the facts about milk production and consumption, human health, animal welfare and factory farmed cows at www.milkmyths.org.uk

Ethical Consumer ratings for non-dairy milk

Buyer's guide to non-dairy milkThis table shows ratings calculated on 21/01/2015 based on the Ethical Consumer Report on Non-Dairy Milks (Nov/Dec 2012).

The report includes info on ‘Who makes what, soya sourcing & GM policies’.

For example Dean Foods, who own[ed] the Alpro, Provamel, Soya Soleil and White Wave brands, is a massive dairy company in the USA, reported to control up to 90% of the processed milk market in some states. [See ‘stop press’ below]

Best Buys

As at 26th October 2015, the ‘live scores’ available to Ethical Consumer subscribers indicated that the best buys for soya milk are: Plamil, The Bridge, Soyatoo! and Granovita (then Alpro/Provamel/Sunrise). For other non-dairy milks the Best Buys are EcoMil Almond, Good Hemp, The Bridge, Oatly and Rice & Rice.

For more discussion of individual companies, policies & milk choices see our Product Info for Non-dairy Milk.

Stop Press 26th October 2015:
It seems that White Wave was spun off from Deans in August 2012.

“The WhiteWave Foods Company is a consumer packaged food and beverage company. It manufactures, markets, distributes, and sells branded plant-based foods and beverages, coffee creamers and beverages, and premium dairy products throughout North America and Europe. The Company’s products include soy milk, flavored creamers, organic milk, yogurt, cheese, butter, sour creams, and whipped creams. It serves the grocery and natural foods channels in the United States. The WhiteWave Foods Company is based in Dallas, Texas.” [ref]

So, whilst the parent company is no longer owned by Deans, with its massive industrial dairy interests, White Wave does have companies involved in ‘premium’ organic dairy products. Hence the improved score for organic Alpro/Provamel of 13.5, (from 8.5).


Plant Milk Sampling with Veggies

Print & distribute the flier

Plant Milk Flier
Plant Milk Flier

Print & distribute the flier

Comments:

Johnny: “To support unhealthy industrially farmed milk full of puss the centre of nottingham was blocked off with barriers, goodness knows how the elderly& physically disabled coped. No wonder cows get TB, if you want to help stop badger culls avoid most milk, please.”

TomClements: “The Milk Race”. What a joke. Trying to propagandize milk as some sort of health-giving food, despite the world’s healthiest societies being entirely dairy-free and supported by largely plant-based food. Dairy only does us, the environment and the animals that produce it massive amounts of harm. It’s a vile industry that wields far too much power over people and governments.


Plamil : Plantmilk Pioneers

Arthur Ling formed Plamil to market The Milk of Human Kindness in 1965!

View the conversation on Twitter


3-Omega-6 Dairy Free Flax Drink

Flax drinkThe Veganuary website says that: “3-Omega-6 Dairy Free Flax Drink is a delicious tasting dairy free drink made with flax seed oil, known to be one of the richest plant based sources of Omega-3.

The Good Karma Foods Europe company website says that the product has “no aftertaste, just a deliciousness which tastes, well…… just like dairy milk!”, however our trial have found a strong & distinctive flavour.


Shortlink to this page http://www.veggies.org.uk/?p=4074


Veggies @ Glastonbury 2013

Glastonbury 2013 was a big success for Veggies Catering Campaign, especially in terms of our vegan campaign outreach.

Veggies 2013 Glastonbury Gallery

On arrival we found that Veggies was sited at a key location at the entrance to the Green Futures Field, right off the Old Railway Track crossroads.

This was great to catch the people going up the track…

Glastonbury 2013

… and those coming back down:

Glastonbury 2013

Glastonbury Panorama

Click here for Lakeside view

Info for Action

Info for actonA big part of our mission was to encourage support for the many events that we attend, including Peace News Summer Camp, the Animal Rights Gathering and Reclaim the Power (No Dash for Gas) Action Camp. Veggies Catering Campaign has a unique roll in uniting movements for positive social change, catering at actions, camps and gatherings.

Other campaigns that we support, such as the Radical Routes network and the Movement for Compassionate Living were featured on impromptu displays.

Our location enabled us to highlight other activities in the Green Futures Field, such as the Speakers Forum, which featured the Lush Charity Pot Slam, and the main Green Information Point further up the track:

Glastonbury 2013

A special mention too to Zia Solar Systems that helped with the power to keep the foods as chilled as the crew!


Pulp Friction Smoothies

Pulp Friction Smoothie BikeWe were delighted to have been loaned a Pulp Friction bike to add d-i-y smoothies to the low-tech, low energy activities at Veggies at Glastonbury.

Festival goers enjoyed fresh fruit smoothies and shakes with Koko Coconut Milk.

Pulp Friction logo

Pulp Friction Smoothie Bar Project, from Nottingham, provides volunteering opportunities for young adults, taking their smoothie bikes to different community events – schools, youth clubs, playschemes, community festivals etc.

Pulp Friction Bike


Goody Good Stuff sweets – too Goody Good to walk on by!

Goody Good Stuff sweets combine the highest quality blend of ingredients including natural fruit juices and extracts which create a beautifully clear consistency and a superior taste experience. The entire line is vegetarian, fat-free, meat-free, dairy-free, nut-free, Halal and Kosher certified.


And yes…

We got to see some band…

Stones at GlastonburyStones at Glastonbury

… and slept for a week after!


To see how all this compares with our plans and expectations, see our glastonbury-badger-action-cafe posting from before the event.


Feedback

badgerOur crew are reflecting on ways to make this huge campaign outreach mission work even better in future. If you have and thought, please contact us.

– “Well, first and foremost, I think we should totally be giving ourselves a big pat of the back. Couldn’t really ask much more from a team. :)”

– Campaign space worked better than it ever has.

– In spite of some fantastic contributions to the Veggies aesthetic, our frontage and customer lounge still looked like the practical marqueue of a not-for-profit, grass roots, campaigning organization, rather than a slick professional venue (IMHO).

– Campaigning: We need to have recurring activities to draw people in like the smoothy maker, taste testings and other good ideas. They need to be on all the time as well, we had a great campaign space and people came when they could interact in some way, but when there was nothing to interact with the space seemed pretty quiet apart from staff 😉 (its Glastonbury they’ll find other things to do). We need to properly brainstorm interactive things we can have inside the space and practice them before the event (maybe use at regular events as well) and have them running as long as the space is open and draw lots of people in and get them educated or at least give them a leaflet.

– One crew member in the multi-use space just didn’t really work in my opinion, you get pulled into a conversation about the badger cull, giving a milk taster round, prepping fruit for the pedal-smoothie, clearing up the space and sign-posting people to the trailer for their coffee. If you add to that trying to start a burger demo, re-organise the merchandise, checking the honesty pots, facepaint and clean up the relishes table, it makes it impossible for 1 person in a multi-use space to do any one of those things efficiently or effectively.

– People used the cafe space when trailer crew encouraged them to, same goes for campaign space. I think if trailer crew felt more joined up with the campaign space and had those quick conversations whilst burgers were waiting or coffee brewing, it would have got a masses more traffic. It’s the point of contact, if we miss that, we miss the person.

– Integrate not just the trailer into the campaign space but the crew and the whole approach – otherwise we really are just serving burgers to rich festival punters and raising funds for Veggies (which is valid but we can do more than just that):

– Trailer crew are resourced with whatever they need to make those conversations with customers possible

– The campaign period is shortened with 2 crew on it at all times or better seek funding or other support to be able to extend the campaigning for a full 12 hours each day.

– Much clearer continuity between the Veggies trailer and the ‘badger cafe’ – customers really didn’t get that it was the same space

– I also think we should have stayed open until 5am as between midnight and 4am everyone who normally camps out around the main stages is somewhere between Arcadia, Shangra La and the stone circle.

– An additional crew member might be be better used helping in kitchen rather than than trailer, so that more cake, bhajis, pizza, soups, meals etc could be made.

– Chrissy enjoyed cooking crew meals, and didn’t mind working through til 9pm most evenings. Surplus meals might be offered on an ad-hoc basis to customers, subject to availability.

– We absolutely should have had some frontage next to Groovy Movie. We were focussed so much on grabbing attention from the cross roads we were actually closing ourselves off from people coming back down from the stone circle, or in the Green Futures Field.

– We need to think about cake display – we should keep an eye out for a two or three tiered cake display with a cover. I also think we should have had cakes, pasties and cold drinks on a table in the marquee with an honestly pot for those who did come in asking.

– The Indian place down the track was already trading when we arrived so we must be open as early as possible. On the Tuesday evening we were the only people open and we were doing steady trade throughout.

– There were times before and after the main festival was running that crew were hungry and the conventional 3 meals a day hadn’t really been considered and planned in.

– I would have liked to have a daily meeting/briefing during which ideally all crew members get together to:
… communicate the ‘extra-tasks’ and priorities of the day, and designate people to action those so everybody knows what to do and how to help
… raise any relevant issues (concerns, worries, requests for help, big-ups…) in order to facilitate communication and relieve any tension amongst ourselves as well as celebrate our hard work 😎

– The festival officially finished on Sunday night. Some of the team arrived home late on Tuesday evening.

A major part of Veggies work involves supporting the public’s interest in all the new vegan products available. Whilst not able to do sampling we were able to encourage potential customers to taste test the foods on our menu, in particular cheeses and plant milks.

Vegusto with gusto at Glasto!

Vegusto taste test

Swiss vegan manufacturers, Vegusto have created a range of ‘cheeses’ based on coconut, rapeseed and sunflower oils, almonds, cashew nuts which really do taste like cheese! And what’s more, the cheeses are not only dairy free, but gluten free, soya free and egg free too.

Bute Island – just ‘bute’ for taste testing!

bute island bute island tasting


Vegan Village Is Back

Vegan Village logoIn November we passed on the news that Vegan Village was to close.

We are delighted to hear that after a few weeks new co-ordinators stepped forward and Vegan Village is back.

Visit the Vegan Village here…


The Vegan Village was established in 1997, and run for 15 years, by vegan internet pioneers Imaner Consultants, who say:

“Running a vegan business can be tough as many are run for altruistic reasons, rather than purely to make money. The internet brought with it an opportunity to help vegan businesses by giving them more marketing muscle, and … we set up the Vegan Village website to do this.

“The Vegan Village website went live in September 1997 with contact details for 44 vegan organisations. We sent out monthly newsletters to help establish the Vegan Village concept and encourage people to get involved. In addition to the listings, there was a noticeboard for small ads, a newsdesk for press releases and news stories, and a recipe of the week to encourage people to visit the website regularly. Mini websites were offered at below cost price to help vegan businesses take their first steps on the net.

“The noticeboard processed thousands of free adverts and become one of the most popular vegan pages on the web.

“The Vegan Village was an ever-present in the Google rankings, a recommended site on BBC Search, and remained the quickest, most cost-effective way for new vegan businesses to announce their presence to the marketplace.”

The Vegan Village was archived by UKWAC Web Archive as part of the ‘unfolding recent history of UK events, interests and activities’. The latest snapshop, archived in 2011 continues to be a valuable source of information.

The Vegan Village was ‘run for fun’ by Liz at Digitalis, with grateful thanks to Andy at Imaner. Digitalis continue to offer website design services to vegan and veggie companies and Imaner Consultants continues as an ethical organisation also offering website design services.

“We would like to say a big thank you to everybody who has supported the Vegan Village over the years.”

…meanwhile…

Veggies compiles The Vegan Business Connection (VBC) to encourage mutual support for cruelty-free businesses, i.e. those using no animal ingredients whatsoever and striving to minimise environmental, human and animal rights abuses.

The V.B.C. gives as much importance to the proprietors, as to the goods or services traded. It is to those who run such businesses that we can look for guarantees of their ethical standards, and knowledge of vegan issues.

Some 300 exclusively vegan businesses can be found in the Vegan Business Coonnection directory

-Quick-Access-
VBC logo
-Click-Here-

If you work in a way that is sympathetic to the promotion of veganism, or supply specific vegan goods / services, or wish to recommend someone else, please contact us.

The Vegan Business Connection also forms the Trading Section of the new Veggies Directory. Information is supplied mainly by the businesses themselves, or through recommendations from other sources.

Use them or loose them – support vegan businesses.

Find information about vegan events on the

Vegan Outreach Diary

Vegan Outreach Diary linkThe Vegan Outreach Diary lists the increasing number of food-based vegan outreach events, from free food stalls to major vegan festivals.

Event Organisers are urged to check the diary and to submit full event details as soon as a date is set, for details to be added to this nationally coordinated diary. Provisional dates may be submitted too.

The Diary is compiled by Veggies Catering Campaign and updated constantly for use by vegan food campaigners nationwide.

The Vegan Outreach Diary is designed to be reciprocally linked from any other group, website or event with a similar mission, to demonstrate the spirit of mutual support and cooperation that is central to Veggies campaigns.


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