Tag: animal rights

World Day Planning

Planning meeting for world-day-for-animals-in-laboratories-wdail-march-nottingham

Chant For All Beings To Be Free

We will come together to chant in unity the mantra: ‘Lokah Samastah Sukhino Bhavantu’ ~ which in essence means ‘May All Beings Be Free.’

We will meet in Jubilee Square in Leicester for this event. This is a public open space. People can come & join in for as long as they please. We invite people to help leaflet & conduct outreach at the same time.

Chanting this powerful mantra assists us in sending compassion to all beings, & in particular those beings that are most often overlooked: the animals.

Over 56 billion farmed animals are killed by humans every year for food. They are bred, enslaved & eventually sent to slaughter. In the dairy industry, cows are artificially made pregnant, their calves separated from them, they are milked by machines & then eventually sent to slaughter when they are of no more use.

This day of chanting will be for the animals. It will be to remember them & to send love & compassion. We will also extend that compassion to those who are not yet aware of the full reality of the meat & dairy industry & its environmental impact. And we’ll send it to those that work tirelessly to raise awareness about the suffering.

Dina Aherne of Imperfectly Vegan and Sailesh Rao Executive Director of Climate Healers with be speaking at the event. Also Sandra HIggins Campaign Director at Go Vegan World and Director at Eden Farmed Animal Sanctuary Ireland.”

Come & join with others of a like mind to chant, to support the animals, and to visualise a humane future. Everyone is welcome regardless of religion or belief.💚🌎🌱

Joan Court R.I.P

Joan Court & DarrenWe are sad to bring you the news of Joan Court‘s death this month. She died very peacefully, her cats around her. She was ninety seven.
 
Joan’s Funeral will be on Wednesday 14th December at 12.45 pm in Cambridge City Crematorium, Huntingdon Road, Cambridge CB3 0JJ

 It will be followed by a party to celebrate Joan’s life at Mill Road Baptist Church, 178 Mill Road, Cambridge, CB1 3LP Veggies will be providing food and drink but it is strictly non-alcoholic!
 
All Joan’s friends are warmly invited. If you are able to come, please email JoanCourt74@gmail.com.
 
Joan requested donations instead of flowers, to be shared equally between Animal Aid and Hunt Sabs.There will be collection boxes at the party.

 It would be lovely if you could bring something purple (e.g. a ribbon or a flower) to put on her coffin at the crematorium.
 
We will have Memory Boards at the party, and we hope that you will post a memory or a thought about Joan. After the party we will put these together into a book to celebrate her life.
 
I do hope you can come, and help us make this a true celebration of an amazing life.
 
Joan was a tireless campaigner who has supported Veggies Catering on many occasions. Her book ‘In the Shadow of Mahatma Gandhi’ has been available from Veggies bookstall.
 


Today we say goodbye to a great warrior for the oppressed, Joan Court who was a nurse, midwife and social worker, who walked with Mahatma Ghandi, who fought for the rights of women in India and Pakistan, who fought for children’s rights and for the rights of non humans. In 2013 she came to the Gloucestershire badger cull zone and, we think, in her mid 90s was the oldest sab in the field for the 2 nights she was out. Total respect and love to this wonderful lady, sleep well Joan, you have earned it xxxxx

Image may contain: 1 person, smiling, cat

A tribute to Joan Court, written by Andrew Tyler of Animal Aid, has appeared on the “other lives” section of the Guardian website & in print edition on 24 December.

https://www.theguardian.com/law/2016/dec/22/joancourtobituary

My friend Joan Court, the animal and human rights activist, who has died aged 97, was driven by a powerful impulse to expose and remedy injustice and cruelty. She was also, as she put it, a “born sensualist”, her tastes running to strong colours, perfumes and “exciting action”. This, and her desire to do good, underpinned her many adventures.

Her start in life was hard: her father, Cecil Court, a solicitor, took his own life, and her mother, Muriel (nee Gibson), was an alcoholic. She had an older brother, Peter.

Joan’s schooling ended when she was 12, after her father’s death. She and her mother moved from their London home to work in domestic service in Cornwall and then Cape Town, South Africa. Returning to London in 1936, she went on to qualify as a nurse and midwife at St Thomas’ hospital, and as a social worker in Bristol. She practised as a midwife and, funded initially by the Friends Service Council (FSC) and later as a World Health Organisation employee, worked in impoverished regions of India and Turkey, and the Appalachian mountains of North America.

In the 1960s, she was appointed director of the NSPCC battered child research unit, and was influential in gaining acceptance of a then unfamiliar concept in the UK.

In 1946, when she was working for the FSC, organising midwifery services in the slums of Calcutta (Kolkata), she met and got to know Mahatma Gandhi. Joan, a lifelong vegetarian, developed a profound respect for his commitment, compassion and determination to achieve change through non-violent means. She tried to emulate these goals, campaigning first for children and, for the last 38 years, for animals.

In 1978, after seeing a poster describing the horrors of animal research, she took part in an Animal Aid anti-vivisection march in Cambridge. The next day she founded a new Cambridge group, which was soon involved in all animal-related issues, including live exports, hunting, shooting, whaling and the meat and dairy industries.

Her advanced age made her attention-grabbing stunts also irresistible to the media. Her animal campaigning began just before she was 60 – when she gained a social anthropology degree from Cambridge. There were banner-hangs, public hunger strikes and sit-downs in inconvenient
places. She locked herself in a cage and chained herself to railings. In speeches and interviews she refused to apologise for radical direct action, although she was opposed to violence.

Her most lasting triumph was, with Pat Griffin and Sue Hughes, as one of three Cambridge “granarchists” who initiated what became a national campaign of opposition to Cambridge University’s plans for a massive new research facility that would have specialised in invasive neurologicalexperiments on monkeys. The university abandoned the project in January  2004.

At the age of 85, she joined the Sea Shepherd flagship, Farley Mowat, on a hunt for illegal fishing vessels in the South Atlantic.

Joan could be self-absorbed, cantankerous, bossy and infuriating, but her friends were friends for life.

 

Save the dogs

On this day, Nottingham Animal Rights will be hosting a day of action against breed prejudice, the breeding industry and the exotic pet trade.

If you would like to help make this day a success, why not come to the NottmAR planning meetings, more details of which can be found here.

© 2019 Veggies

Theme by Anders NorenUp ↑